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Podcasts



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One to One

Crying: Keith Brymer-Jones and Susie Orbach (3 days old [30/05/23])

audioPresenter of The Great Pottery Throwdown Keith Brymer-Jones finds that watching people create pottery often moves him to tears. In this episode he talks to psychotherapist Susie Orbach about why we cry and how it can be a form of communication. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio

Crying: Keith Brymer-Jones and Craig Mealing (10 days old [23/05/23])

audioKeith Brymer-Jones from the Great Pottery Throwdown has become known for being moved to tears by a pot someone has crafted. In this episode of One to One, he talks to ex-serviceman Craig Mealing who is recovering from PTSD, about dealing with emotions and learning to cry. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio

Suzy Wrack: The House I Grew Up In (78 days old [16/03/23])

audioFootball writer Suzy Wrack talks to urban geographer and professor at Boston University, Loretta Lees, about how growing up on council estates shaped their lives, and led them to studying the impact of space and design. Produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs.

Suzy Wrack: The House I Grew Up In (94 days old [28/02/23])

audioFootball writer Suzy Wrack meets with Joanne Marsden to share their stories of growing up on council estates. Suzy grew up in on an estate in north east London, while Joanne was born on Park Hill estate in Sheffield; the council block inspired by the French architect Le Corbusier, who designed high-rises with community in mind. They discuss his idea of 'streets in the sky' - landings wide enough for milk floats to drive past high in the air and rows of shops within the estate. Together, they talk about how their experiences shaped their lives and interests in architecture and community - and [...]

Gaming and Me: Ellie Gibson speaks to Andrew Przybylski (101 days old [21/02/23])

audioEllie Gibson has spent her life playing and writing about video games. It is a passion that she enjoys sharing with her son but as a parent she's become interested in the impact games play on the mind and behaviour. It's an emerging area of science and one that's frequently skewed by fevered debates about whether games are "good" or "bad". Ellie's theory is that exploring online worlds and connecting with one another through games is far more constructive than endlessly scrolling through social media, and it's a theory she explores with Professor Andrew Przybylski at the Oxford Internet Ins[...]

Gaming and Me: Ellie Gibson speaks to Keza MacDonald (108 days old [14/02/23])

audioKeza MacDonald left home at sixteen to work in video games journalism, and when she first met Ellie Gibson on a trip her glasses were held together by sticky tape. Ellie was already established in the industry and became a mentor to Keza. They talk about what it was like being one of only a handful of women working in video games journalism at the time which meant being taken to strip clubs and having to laugh off inappropriate behaviour by male colleagues. Comparing their experiences to today they describe how streaming platforms have created a more open and inclusive gaming culture from w[...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Simon Godwin (115 days old [07/02/23])

audioImagine this: you've spent months, years even, working on a show. Now it's press night. Sat in a silent row, or peppered around the theatre, are the people whose life's work is to criticise yours - the critics. So what’s it like when your lovingly crafted new play opens and you see them out there, ready to tell the world what they think of it? Top theatre director Simon Godwin, who's worked at the National Theatre, the Bristol Old Vic and is now at Washington DC's Shakespeare Theatre Company, bares his soul about how it really feels when the lights go down and the little notebooks come out. [...]

Grief: Ramita Navai and Richard Osman (116 days old [06/02/23])

audioAs a journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict in countries that can be tricky to operate in, Ramita Navai is good at compartmentalising the trauma she's seen and feels mentally resilient. But when her own father died three years ago, she was - and still is - overwhelmed by the grief. She talks to bestselling author and friend, Richard Osman about his experience of grieving for his estranged father compared with her own. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio.

Grief: Ramita Navai and Mary-Frances O’Connor (116 days old [06/02/23])

audioRamita Navai is a foreign affairs journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict around the world. She has reported from war zones and hostile territories in over forty countries, and although good at compartmentalising the trauma she's witnessed, nothing could prepare her for the grief she felt when her own father died three years ago. In this episode, she speaks to Mary-Frances O’Connor, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, who runs the grief, loss and social stress (Glass) lab, which explores the effects of grief on the brain and the body. Together, they talk [...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Sarah Crompton (122 days old [31/01/23])

audioWhat's it really like wielding the little notebook of doom or glory? Sarah Crompton, theatre critic for What's On Stage and dance critic for The Observer, tells all to broadcaster Luke Jones, who once dipped his toe into that world himself. They talk warm white wine, the imagined audience, vomiting and the most unforgiveable critical gaffe of all. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

(C) BBC 2023

One to One

Crying: Keith Brymer-Jones and Susie Orbach (3 days old [30/05/23])

audioPresenter of The Great Pottery Throwdown Keith Brymer-Jones finds that watching people create pottery often moves him to tears. In this episode he talks to psychotherapist Susie Orbach about why we cry and how it can be a form of communication. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio

Crying: Keith Brymer-Jones and Craig Mealing (10 days old [23/05/23])

audioKeith Brymer-Jones from the Great Pottery Throwdown has become known for being moved to tears by a pot someone has crafted. In this episode of One to One, he talks to ex-serviceman Craig Mealing who is recovering from PTSD, about dealing with emotions and learning to cry. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio

Suzy Wrack: The House I Grew Up In (78 days old [16/03/23])

audioFootball writer Suzy Wrack talks to urban geographer and professor at Boston University, Loretta Lees, about how growing up on council estates shaped their lives, and led them to studying the impact of space and design. Produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs.

Suzy Wrack: The House I Grew Up In (94 days old [28/02/23])

audioFootball writer Suzy Wrack meets with Joanne Marsden to share their stories of growing up on council estates. Suzy grew up in on an estate in north east London, while Joanne was born on Park Hill estate in Sheffield; the council block inspired by the French architect Le Corbusier, who designed high-rises with community in mind. They discuss his idea of 'streets in the sky' - landings wide enough for milk floats to drive past high in the air and rows of shops within the estate. Together, they talk about how their experiences shaped their lives and interests in architecture and community - and [...]

Gaming and Me: Ellie Gibson speaks to Andrew Przybylski (101 days old [21/02/23])

audioEllie Gibson has spent her life playing and writing about video games. It is a passion that she enjoys sharing with her son but as a parent she's become interested in the impact games play on the mind and behaviour. It's an emerging area of science and one that's frequently skewed by fevered debates about whether games are "good" or "bad". Ellie's theory is that exploring online worlds and connecting with one another through games is far more constructive than endlessly scrolling through social media, and it's a theory she explores with Professor Andrew Przybylski at the Oxford Internet Ins[...]

Gaming and Me: Ellie Gibson speaks to Keza MacDonald (108 days old [14/02/23])

audioKeza MacDonald left home at sixteen to work in video games journalism, and when she first met Ellie Gibson on a trip her glasses were held together by sticky tape. Ellie was already established in the industry and became a mentor to Keza. They talk about what it was like being one of only a handful of women working in video games journalism at the time which meant being taken to strip clubs and having to laugh off inappropriate behaviour by male colleagues. Comparing their experiences to today they describe how streaming platforms have created a more open and inclusive gaming culture from w[...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Simon Godwin (115 days old [07/02/23])

audioImagine this: you've spent months, years even, working on a show. Now it's press night. Sat in a silent row, or peppered around the theatre, are the people whose life's work is to criticise yours - the critics. So what’s it like when your lovingly crafted new play opens and you see them out there, ready to tell the world what they think of it? Top theatre director Simon Godwin, who's worked at the National Theatre, the Bristol Old Vic and is now at Washington DC's Shakespeare Theatre Company, bares his soul about how it really feels when the lights go down and the little notebooks come out. [...]

Grief: Ramita Navai and Richard Osman (116 days old [06/02/23])

audioAs a journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict in countries that can be tricky to operate in, Ramita Navai is good at compartmentalising the trauma she's seen and feels mentally resilient. But when her own father died three years ago, she was - and still is - overwhelmed by the grief. She talks to bestselling author and friend, Richard Osman about his experience of grieving for his estranged father compared with her own. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio.

Grief: Ramita Navai and Mary-Frances O’Connor (116 days old [06/02/23])

audioRamita Navai is a foreign affairs journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict around the world. She has reported from war zones and hostile territories in over forty countries, and although good at compartmentalising the trauma she's witnessed, nothing could prepare her for the grief she felt when her own father died three years ago. In this episode, she speaks to Mary-Frances O’Connor, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, who runs the grief, loss and social stress (Glass) lab, which explores the effects of grief on the brain and the body. Together, they talk [...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Sarah Crompton (122 days old [31/01/23])

audioWhat's it really like wielding the little notebook of doom or glory? Sarah Crompton, theatre critic for What's On Stage and dance critic for The Observer, tells all to broadcaster Luke Jones, who once dipped his toe into that world himself. They talk warm white wine, the imagined audience, vomiting and the most unforgiveable critical gaffe of all. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

(C) BBC 2023

The Life Scientific

Gillian Reid on making chemistry count (3 days old [30/05/23])

audioHow often do you think about chemistry? The chances are, not often - but it is vital to every part of our lives, from the air we breathe, to the processes that take place inside our bodies and the materials we use. Gillian Reid is Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Southampton and she is on a mission to make sure we all know what chemistry can do for us - and how it is tackling some of society’s biggest challenges. Hers is a story of firsts - the first in her immediate family to go to university and the first female member of staff in the chemistry department at the Unive[...]

Andre Geim on levitating frogs, graphene and 2D materials (10 days old [23/05/23])

audioThe world around us is three-dimensional. Yet, there are materials that can be regarded as two-dimensional. They are only one layer of atoms thick and have remarkable properties that are different from their three-dimensional counterparts. Sir Andre Geim created the first-ever man-made 2D material, by isolating graphene, and is one of the pioneers in this line of research. Even beyond his Nobel Prize-winning work on graphene, he has explored new ideas in many different areas of physics throughout his career. Andre tells Jim about his time growing up in the Soviet Union, being rejected from uni[...]

Julie Williams on Alzheimer’s disease (66 days old [28/03/23])

audioThere are almost a million people in the UK living with dementia, and Alzheimer’s is the most common form. But the disease actually starts long before any noticeable symptoms appear, and over the past decade, studies have shown that it is much more complex than previously thought. Julie Williams has been at the forefront of this effort, uncovering the genes that make us susceptible, and has transformed our understanding of this devastating disease. She has brought researchers together to create bigger datasets and more powerful studies. Her current work with scientists from other fields, lik[...]

James Jackson on understanding earthquakes and building resilience (73 days old [21/03/23])

audioSince 1900, our best estimates suggest that earthquakes have caused around 2.3 million deaths worldwide; we saw the devastating effects of one just recently, in Turkey and Syria. And as scientists have been at pains to point out over the years, there is no reliable short-term warning system. But thanks to the work of people like James Jackson, an Emeritus Professor of Active Tectonics at the University of Cambridge, we are finding new ways of understanding and withstanding seismic activity. James tells Jim Al-Khalili about his career travelling the world in search of quake sites and fault l[...]

Marie Johnston on health psychology and the power of behavioural shifts (80 days old [14/03/23])

audioMarie Johnston is a pioneer in the field of health psychology: the discipline that seeks to understand how psychological, behavioural and cultural factors contribute to our physical and mental health. Today an emeritus professor in health psychology at the University of Aberdeen, her career exploring behavioural interventions has shown that even the subtlest shift in how we act can dramatically change our behaviour and lives for the better – whether that’s in an individual recovering from a stroke, or a nation coming to terms with pandemic safety measures, while her work setting up the UK’s f[...]

Julia King on manipulating metals and decarbonising transport (87 days old [07/03/23])

audioProfessor Dame Julia King, Baroness Brown of Cambridge, is an engineer whose fascination with metals, and skill for handling both research projects and people, has taken her from academia to industry to the House of Lords. She tells Jim Al-Khalili how the dressmaking skills she learnt from her mother as a child helped her to understand the composite structures used in wind turbines later in life. And how she designed metal alloys that are resistant to both large and small cracks. As the author of the UK government's Review of Low Carbon Cars in 2007, Julia set out a route to decarbonising a[...]

Danny Altmann on how T cells fight disease (94 days old [28/02/23])

audioJim Al-Khalili talks T cells, our immune response and Long Covid with Prof Danny Altmann. Danny Altmann joined ‘team T cells’ in his twenties and has been studying how these killer operate ever since. How do they know which cells to search and destroy? The T cell wing of our immune response is highly targeted and incredibly clever, on a par with the most sophisticated military intelligence operation and in recent decades there have been dramatic advances in our understanding of how it all works . Danny tells Jim how he came to study our immune response to all sorts of pathogens, from ant[...]

Haley Gomez on cosmic dust (101 days old [21/02/23])

audioJim Al-Khalili talks to astrophysicist Haley Gomez about defying expectations and becoming a world expert on cosmic dust. For centuries, cosmic dust was a major source of irritation to optical astronomers because, like smog, it stopped them from seeing the stars. Now studies of these tiny particles are challenging some deeply held assumptions about the physics of the universe. Haley’s research has changed the textbook explanation of how cosmic dust is formed and helped to open our eyes to just how many galaxies there are in the universe. In 2018 she was awarded an MBE for services to physi[...]

Adrian Smith on the power of Bayesian statistics (115 days old [07/02/23])

audioHow a once-derided approach to statistics paved the way for AI. Jim Al-Khalili talks to pioneering mathematician, Professor Sir Adrian Smith. Accused early in his career of ‘trying to destroy the processes of science’, Adrian went on to prove that a branch of statistics (invented by the Reverend Thomas Bayes in 1764) could be used by computers to analyse vast sets of data and to learn from that data. His mathematical proofs showed that Bayesian statistics could be applied to all sorts of real world problems: from improving survival rates for kidney transplant patients to tracking Russian s[...]

Clifford Johnson on making sense of black holes and movie plots (122 days old [31/01/23])

audioClifford Johnson's career to date has spanned some seemingly very different industries - from exploring quantum mechanics around string theory and black holes, to consulting on some of Hollywood's biggest movies; but it makes sense once you understand his ambition of making science accessible to all. A Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Clifford's worked in the United States for decades – but was born in the UK, then spent his formative years on the Caribbean island of Montserrat, before moving back to England to study[...]

(C) BBC 2023

Ipswich