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Podcasts



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One to One

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (5 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (12 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Dr Margee Kerr (19 days old [14/06/22])

audioBefore her life as a financial journalist began, Felicity Hannah could more often be found wearing a top hat, leading tourists round the ghostly streets beneath Edinburgh. She loves sudden startles and that sense of creeping enjoyable fear in person, in books and on screen, but she wants to know why. Why are some humans wired to get a thrill out of fear? Why not all of us? Felicity talks to fear expert Dr Margee Kerr, sociologist and author of Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, about what happens in our bodies when we’re frightened, and how, surprisingly, this can help us bui[...]

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Neil Gaiman (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioSpooky tour guide turned financial journalist Felicity Hannah wants to know why being scared can feel so good. Why do we frighten ourselves for fun? Why do we love scary stories and terrifying TV? She asks Neil Gaiman, author of Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Neverwhere and The Sandman – a storyteller who knows all about the power of fear to fascinate and delight us. Felicity and Neil talk about what scares them the most, when fear loses its thrill, and, of course, ‘horror for four year olds’. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Dr Martha Newson (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to anthropologist Dr Martha Newson, who has studied rave, about about why humans have always partied, how it can bond us, and whether rave can change society for the better. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Eris Drew (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to DJ Eris Drew about how rave culture triggered massive changes in each of their lives. For Faranak, it meant rebelling against the strict culture of her home country of Iran, and finding a new life elsewhere. And for Eris, it meant even more profound questions about identity. But what is it about the "motherbeat", as Eris calls it, that makes it so powerful? Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis meets Vee Kativhu (250 days old [26/10/21])

audioVee Kativhu has a kind of fame incomprehensible to most people aged over 40. She makes videos in which she struggles with essay deadlines, gives study tips and celebrates getting the keys to her first flat. Tens of thousands of people watch each vlog she posts, so with so much of her life public, how does she maintain her privacy? Producer Sally Heaven

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis and Sophie Ellis Bextor (257 days old [19/10/21])

audioSophie Ellis-Bextor has the kind of fame which brings with it high profile television shows and recognition in the street. Her mum, Janet Ellis was in millions of living rooms every week but the only perk Sophie can remember was jumping the queue at Madame Tussauds. Mother and daughter talk about fame, and how the whole experience has changed over the decades. Producer Sally Heaven

Changing Language: Cindy Yu meets Asifa Majid (265 days old [11/10/21])

audioA move from China to the UK aged 9 meant a new language for journalist and broadcast editor at The Spectator, Cindy Yu. How did that change her upbringing and view of the world? She meets Asifa Majid, professor of language, communication and cultural cognition at the University of York. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard

Changing Language: Cindy Yu meets Leslie Orozco (265 days old [11/10/21])

audioJournalist and broadcast editor at The Spectator, Cindy Yu, moved from China to the UK aged 9. That meant switching languages. So how did that change her childhood and her view of the world? Cindy meets Leslie, who moved from the US to Mexico at a similar age. Leslie says it was traumatic at the time but now she feels the experience was a positive one, and she is proudly bilingual. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard

(C) BBC 2022

One to One

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (5 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (12 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Dr Margee Kerr (19 days old [14/06/22])

audioBefore her life as a financial journalist began, Felicity Hannah could more often be found wearing a top hat, leading tourists round the ghostly streets beneath Edinburgh. She loves sudden startles and that sense of creeping enjoyable fear in person, in books and on screen, but she wants to know why. Why are some humans wired to get a thrill out of fear? Why not all of us? Felicity talks to fear expert Dr Margee Kerr, sociologist and author of Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, about what happens in our bodies when we’re frightened, and how, surprisingly, this can help us bui[...]

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Neil Gaiman (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioSpooky tour guide turned financial journalist Felicity Hannah wants to know why being scared can feel so good. Why do we frighten ourselves for fun? Why do we love scary stories and terrifying TV? She asks Neil Gaiman, author of Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Neverwhere and The Sandman – a storyteller who knows all about the power of fear to fascinate and delight us. Felicity and Neil talk about what scares them the most, when fear loses its thrill, and, of course, ‘horror for four year olds’. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Dr Martha Newson (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to anthropologist Dr Martha Newson, who has studied rave, about about why humans have always partied, how it can bond us, and whether rave can change society for the better. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Eris Drew (23 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to DJ Eris Drew about how rave culture triggered massive changes in each of their lives. For Faranak, it meant rebelling against the strict culture of her home country of Iran, and finding a new life elsewhere. And for Eris, it meant even more profound questions about identity. But what is it about the "motherbeat", as Eris calls it, that makes it so powerful? Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis meets Vee Kativhu (250 days old [26/10/21])

audioVee Kativhu has a kind of fame incomprehensible to most people aged over 40. She makes videos in which she struggles with essay deadlines, gives study tips and celebrates getting the keys to her first flat. Tens of thousands of people watch each vlog she posts, so with so much of her life public, how does she maintain her privacy? Producer Sally Heaven

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis and Sophie Ellis Bextor (257 days old [19/10/21])

audioSophie Ellis-Bextor has the kind of fame which brings with it high profile television shows and recognition in the street. Her mum, Janet Ellis was in millions of living rooms every week but the only perk Sophie can remember was jumping the queue at Madame Tussauds. Mother and daughter talk about fame, and how the whole experience has changed over the decades. Producer Sally Heaven

Changing Language: Cindy Yu meets Asifa Majid (265 days old [11/10/21])

audioA move from China to the UK aged 9 meant a new language for journalist and broadcast editor at The Spectator, Cindy Yu. How did that change her upbringing and view of the world? She meets Asifa Majid, professor of language, communication and cultural cognition at the University of York. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard

Changing Language: Cindy Yu meets Leslie Orozco (265 days old [11/10/21])

audioJournalist and broadcast editor at The Spectator, Cindy Yu, moved from China to the UK aged 9. That meant switching languages. So how did that change her childhood and her view of the world? Cindy meets Leslie, who moved from the US to Mexico at a similar age. Leslie says it was traumatic at the time but now she feels the experience was a positive one, and she is proudly bilingual. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard

(C) BBC 2022

The Life Scientific

Sir Martin Landray on saving over a million lives (5 days old [28/06/22])

audioWho could forget the beginning of 2020, when a ‘mysterious viral pneumonia’ emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Soon, other countries were affected and deaths around the world began to climb. Perhaps most alarmingly of all, there were no proven treatments to help prevent those deaths. As the World Health Organisation declared the Covid-19 outbreak a pandemic, and the UK and the rest of the world braced itself for what was to come, doctor and drug-trial designer Martin Landray had his mind on a solution, devising the protocol, or blueprint, for the world’s largest drug trial for Covid-19. [...]

Vlatko Vedral on the universe as quantum information (12 days old [21/06/22])

audioVlatko Vedral describes himself as a quantum information practitioner, who believes that our universe is made up of quantum bits of information. It is information, he tells Professor Jim Al-Khalili, rather than energy or matter, the traditional building blocks of classical Newtonian physics, that can help us to understand the nature of reality. Vlatko is Professor of Quantum Information Science at the University of Oxford and the Principal Investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and he talks to Jim in front of an audience at the Cheltenha[...]

Adam Hart on ants, bees and insect burgers (19 days old [14/06/22])

audioAnt-loving professor, Adam Hart, shares his passion for leaf cutting ants with Jim Al Khalili. Why do they put leaves in piles for other ants to pick up? Talking at the Hay Festival, Adam describes the experiments he designed to test the intelligence of the hive mind. When does a waggle dance become a tremble dance? And how do the honey bees know when this moment should be? We like the phrase ‘as busy as a bee’. In fact, bees spend a lot of time doing nothing at all, a sensible strategy from the point of view of natural selection. And where does Adam stand on insect burgers? P[...]

Jacinta Tan on anorexia nervosa and the mind (26 days old [07/06/22])

audioWhen a person with severe anorexia nervosa refuses food, the very treatment they need to survive, is that refusal carefully considered and rational, as it can appear to those around them? Or is it really the illness that’s causing them to say ‘no’? This is one of the thorny ethical dilemmas that Jacinta Tan has wrestled with over the course of her career. She is deeply curious about the mind, and has spent hundreds of hours sitting with people with anorexia nervosa, not persuading them to eat, rather listening to them talk about what’s going on in their minds and how the illness influence[...]

Pete Smith on why soil matters (33 days old [31/05/22])

audioPete Smith is very down to earth. Not least because he’s interested in soil and the vital role it plays in helping us to feed the world, mitigate climate change and maintain a rich diversity of species on planet earth. He was born in a pub and failed the 11+ exam (designed to identify bright children just like him) but he became a distinguished professor nonetheless. Tackling climate change in isolation is a mistake, he says. We need to consider all the challenges facing humanity and identify strategies that deliver benefits on all fronts: food security, bio-diversity and human development [...]

Chi Onwurah on why engineering is a caring profession. (40 days old [24/05/22])

audioChi Onwurah tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to become a telecoms engineer and why engineering is a caring profession. As a black, working class woman from a council estate in Newcastle, she was in a minority of one studying engineering at university in London and encountered terrible racism and sexism. She went on to build digital networks all over the world, the networks that make today's instant multimedia communications possible. And Chi built the first mobile phone network in Nigeria, when the country was without a reliable electricity supply. Today she is Shadow Minister for Scienc[...]

Ailie MacAdam on the biggest construction project in Europe (96 days old [29/03/22])

audioAilie's first engineering challenge was working out how to get the solids to settle in a mixture of raw sewage at a treatment plant in Stuttgart. Years later, she worked on the Boston Big Dig and realised that large-scale construction projects were her thing. A seven lane highway was rerouted underground and a bridge built using blocks of expanded polystyrene to support the on off ramps. When Bostonians complained about the vibrations from all the drilling, their beds were put on springs. She returned home to the UK to run the transformation of St Pancras Station in London, creating an interna[...]

Ben Garrod on conservation and extinction (103 days old [22/03/22])

audioBen Garrod is an obsessive bone collector and wild animal behaviourist. He was destined for a career in medicine but a chance encounter with primatologist Jane Goodall reignited his life long passion for conservation and led to him managing and researching the habituation of wild chimpanzees in Africa. It was a chance to record primate behaviour that had never been seen before and examine how resilient chimps can be to anthropogenic change. Further extraordinary insights into the speed of evolution through the clues in the bones of island monkeys was to follow. He is a professor of Evolution[...]

Steve Brusatte on the fall of dinosaurs and the rise of mammals (110 days old [15/03/22])

audioSteve Brusatte analyses the pace of evolutionary change and tries to answer big questions. Why did the dinosaurs die out and the mammals survive? How did dinosaurs evolve into birds? If you met a Velociraptor today you’d probably mistake it for a large flightless bird, says Steve. His intense interest in T. rex, Triceratops and all the other dinosaur species developed when he was a teenager and continues to this day. More recently, however, he’s focussed on the long history of mammals. For hundreds of millions of years, our mammalian ancestors remained small. Most were mouse-sized. None w[...]

Shankar Balasubramanian on decoding DNA (117 days old [08/03/22])

audioSir Shankar Balasubramanian is responsible for a revolution in medicine. The method he invented for reading, at speed, the unique genetic code that makes each one of us who we are, is ten million times faster than the technology that was used in the human genome project at the turn of the century. What’s more, it can be done much more cheaply than before and on a desktop machine. And it’s transforming healthcare, by helping us to understand the genetic basis of many diseases (particularly cancers) and to develop new diagnostic tests, medicines and personalised treatments. ‘DNA has never f[...]

(C) BBC 2022

Ipswich