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Podcasts



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One to One

Friendship: Sima Kotecha with Ella Risbridger (1 day old)

audioBBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha talks to the cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship - from declaring someone your best friend after a drunken party to longer term, deeper relationships. Are group friendships better than one on one relationships, and how much can you really depend on friends when the chips are down? Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury talks to Saj Khan (6 days old [24/02/21])

audioBBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother five years ago. He says it was not a difficult decision to make. Once he heard she only had 3 years to live unless he stepped up, his decision was already made. The transplant transformed her life and Sabet says it opened his eyes to the whole issue of organ donation. During his personal donation journey he discovered that there is a lack of organ donors from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the UK and this can lead to extra-long waits for a transplant. In this, the last of three programmes, Sabet talks to Saj Khan, [...]

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury meets Faruk Choudhury (7 days old [24/02/21])

audioFive years ago BBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. She’d been given just three years to live and the transplant transformed her life. Sabet, who is of Bangladeshi origin, says it wasn’t a difficult decision to make once he realised she could be waiting for years, because of a shortage of Asian donors in the UK. In this, the second of three programmes, Sabet talks to Faruk Choudhury. He is no relation, but he was Lord Mayor of Bristol in 2013 and he set out to increase the number of blood and organ donations from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the ci[...]

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury with Kay Hamilton (7 days old [24/02/21])

audioFive years ago Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. It transformed her life. Sabet, a BBC journalist, says the experience changed his life for the better too. He’s now fitter and healthier than before and he’s forged a closer relationship with his parents. Organ donation was never on his radar before his mother became so ill, but it’s an issue that’s very real to him now. In this, the first of three programmes, Sabet talks to Kay Hamilton, his Kidney Coordinator, who played such an important part in his donation journey – and someone he has kept in close contact with since his oper[...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard and actor Ben Hopwood (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioFor more than 30 years arts journalist and broadcaster Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts. But just what is success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who makes that judgement anyway? The fairy story we love to hear is that all you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But for many the dream does not materialise. They don’t get that lucky break. For others it’s just a long hard slog, and then there are those who reframe their ambitions as they go thro[...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard with opera singer Patrick Egersborg (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioWhat constitutes success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who gets to make that judgement anyway? Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. She says in many cases there is the same narrative arc, that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But this is just a fairy tale, surely! So what does success and failure really mean in the artistic world? Many [...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard meets author Debbie Bayne (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioRosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. In the background, there lurks the same narrative arc: that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours! But nothing's ever simple. Many people don't ever achieve the success they wanted or expected, for others it’s just a long hard slog, and then there are many whose ambitions are reframed as they go through life. Rosie explores what c[...]

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-Rose Craig talks to Zakiya Mckenzie (155 days old [29/09/20])

audio18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world’s’ birds in her global travels. What she doesn’t see as a British Bangladeshi are many like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. In recent years she has run Nature Camps to actively encourage Black and Visible Minority ethnic people outdoors. In this, the second of two programmes, she shares her experiences and challenges with Zakiya Mckenzie: postgraduate student, writer in residence with the Forestry Commission in 2019 and Ambassador for Black and Green[...]

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-Rose Craig talks to Rhiane Fatinikun (162 days old [22/09/20])

audioIn the first of two programmes exploring how we can increase diversity outdoors in the rural landscape, 18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl talks to Rhiane Fatinikun about Black Girls Hike which she founded about a year ago to enable black women to benefit from the comradery of other black women and enjoy the tranquillity of rural areas. Mya-Rose Craig is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world’s birds in her global travels. But what she doesn’t see as a British Bangladeshi are many people like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. I[...]

Body shape: Helen Mort & Anyika Onuora (169 days old [15/09/20])

audioPoet and runner Helen Mort talks to retired Olympic track and field athlete Anyika Onuora about body image in sport. In the last of three programmes about body modification and the relationship between how we present ourselves physically to the world and how we feel, Helen swaps experiences with Anyika about striving for ’the perfect image‘ and the effects training and competitive sport have on the body’s shape. Anyika reveals her lack of confidence about her body and how she managed this whilst living her life in the public eye in front of vast crowds and TV cameras. Producer Sarah Blunt

(C) BBC 2021

One to One

Friendship: Sima Kotecha with Ella Risbridger (1 day old)

audioBBC News correspondent Sima Kotecha talks to the cook and writer Ella Risbridger about friendship - from declaring someone your best friend after a drunken party to longer term, deeper relationships. Are group friendships better than one on one relationships, and how much can you really depend on friends when the chips are down? Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury talks to Saj Khan (6 days old [24/02/21])

audioBBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother five years ago. He says it was not a difficult decision to make. Once he heard she only had 3 years to live unless he stepped up, his decision was already made. The transplant transformed her life and Sabet says it opened his eyes to the whole issue of organ donation. During his personal donation journey he discovered that there is a lack of organ donors from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the UK and this can lead to extra-long waits for a transplant. In this, the last of three programmes, Sabet talks to Saj Khan, [...]

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury meets Faruk Choudhury (7 days old [24/02/21])

audioFive years ago BBC journalist Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. She’d been given just three years to live and the transplant transformed her life. Sabet, who is of Bangladeshi origin, says it wasn’t a difficult decision to make once he realised she could be waiting for years, because of a shortage of Asian donors in the UK. In this, the second of three programmes, Sabet talks to Faruk Choudhury. He is no relation, but he was Lord Mayor of Bristol in 2013 and he set out to increase the number of blood and organ donations from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities in the ci[...]

My Donation Story: Sabet Choudhury with Kay Hamilton (7 days old [24/02/21])

audioFive years ago Sabet Choudhury donated a kidney to his mother. It transformed her life. Sabet, a BBC journalist, says the experience changed his life for the better too. He’s now fitter and healthier than before and he’s forged a closer relationship with his parents. Organ donation was never on his radar before his mother became so ill, but it’s an issue that’s very real to him now. In this, the first of three programmes, Sabet talks to Kay Hamilton, his Kidney Coordinator, who played such an important part in his donation journey – and someone he has kept in close contact with since his oper[...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard and actor Ben Hopwood (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioFor more than 30 years arts journalist and broadcaster Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts. But just what is success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who makes that judgement anyway? The fairy story we love to hear is that all you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But for many the dream does not materialise. They don’t get that lucky break. For others it’s just a long hard slog, and then there are those who reframe their ambitions as they go thro[...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard with opera singer Patrick Egersborg (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioWhat constitutes success and failure, particularly in the creative industries? And who gets to make that judgement anyway? Rosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. She says in many cases there is the same narrative arc, that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours. But this is just a fairy tale, surely! So what does success and failure really mean in the artistic world? Many [...]

The Dream of Success: Rosie Millard meets author Debbie Bayne (37 days old [25/01/21])

audioRosie Millard has reported on people following their dreams and striving for success in the unpredictable world of the creative arts throughout her 30 years as an arts journalist and broadcaster. In the background, there lurks the same narrative arc: that luck and persistence will win the day. All you need to do is follow your dream, and success will be yours! But nothing's ever simple. Many people don't ever achieve the success they wanted or expected, for others it’s just a long hard slog, and then there are many whose ambitions are reframed as they go through life. Rosie explores what c[...]

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-Rose Craig talks to Zakiya Mckenzie (155 days old [29/09/20])

audio18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world’s’ birds in her global travels. What she doesn’t see as a British Bangladeshi are many like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. In recent years she has run Nature Camps to actively encourage Black and Visible Minority ethnic people outdoors. In this, the second of two programmes, she shares her experiences and challenges with Zakiya Mckenzie: postgraduate student, writer in residence with the Forestry Commission in 2019 and Ambassador for Black and Green[...]

Diversity Outdoors - Mya-Rose Craig talks to Rhiane Fatinikun (162 days old [22/09/20])

audioIn the first of two programmes exploring how we can increase diversity outdoors in the rural landscape, 18 year old Mya-Rose Craig, aka Birdgirl talks to Rhiane Fatinikun about Black Girls Hike which she founded about a year ago to enable black women to benefit from the comradery of other black women and enjoy the tranquillity of rural areas. Mya-Rose Craig is a very keen birdwatcher having seen over half the world’s birds in her global travels. But what she doesn’t see as a British Bangladeshi are many people like herself in the forests, fens, mountains and other rural landscapes in the UK. I[...]

Body shape: Helen Mort & Anyika Onuora (169 days old [15/09/20])

audioPoet and runner Helen Mort talks to retired Olympic track and field athlete Anyika Onuora about body image in sport. In the last of three programmes about body modification and the relationship between how we present ourselves physically to the world and how we feel, Helen swaps experiences with Anyika about striving for ’the perfect image‘ and the effects training and competitive sport have on the body’s shape. Anyika reveals her lack of confidence about her body and how she managed this whilst living her life in the public eye in front of vast crowds and TV cameras. Producer Sarah Blunt

(C) BBC 2021

The Life Scientific

Sarah Bridle on the carbon footprint of food (1 day old)

audioWhat would happen to our carbon emissions if we all went vegan? Astrophysicist, Sarah Bridle tells Jim Al-Khalili why she switched her attention from galaxies to food. A rising star in the study of extra-galactic astronomy, Sarah was a driving force behind one of the most ambitious astronomy projects of recent times, the Dark Energy Survey of the universe. A few years ago, she started trying to calculate the carbon emissions from different foods so that she could make more informed choices about what she was eating in terms of the impact they were having on climate change. Before long, she wa[...]

Richard Bentall on the causes of mental ill health (8 days old [23/02/21])

audioFor a long time people who heard voices or suffered paranoid delusions were thought to be too crazy to benefit from talking therapies. As a young man working on a prison psychiatric ward, Richard Bentall thought otherwise. Together with a small group of clinical psychologists, he pioneered the use of the talking therapy CBT for psychosis and conducted rigorous randomized controlled trials to find out if and why it worked. Turns out, having a good relationship with your the therapist is at the heart of why therapy succeeds, regardless of the type of therapy practised. Richard talks to Jim Al-[...]

Jane Hurst on the secret life of mice (15 days old [16/02/21])

audioMice, like humans, prefer to be treated with a little dignity, and that extends to how they are handled. Pick a mouse up by its tail, as was the norm in laboratories for decades, and it gets anxious. Make a mouse anxious and it can skew the results of the research it’s being used for. What mice like, and how they behave, is the focus of Professor Jane Hurst’s research. Much of that behaviour, she’s discovered, can be revealed by following what they do with their noses - where they take them and what’s contained in the scent marks they sniff. Now William Prescott Professor of Animal Science [...]

Anne Johnson on the importance of public health (29 days old [02/02/21])

audioPublic health has been on all of our minds during the pandemic and Prof Dame Anne Johnson has spent more time thinking about it than most of us. She studies the human behaviours that enable viruses to spread and is an architect of a highly influential report on Covid-19 published in July 2020 by the Academy of Medical Sciences, Preparing for a Challenging Winter. For many years Anne was uncertain about a career in medicine. But the time she spent in the slums of Caracas and working as a GP in some deprived areas of Newcastle opened her eyes to the importance of good public health. In th[...]

Giles Yeo on how our genes can make us fat (36 days old [26/01/21])

audioMany of us think we’re in control of what we eat and that, coupled with what we do, dictates our shape and size. It’s physics after all - if you eat too much and move too little, you put on weight; do the opposite, and you lose it. Genes, the theory goes, have minimal if any effect on our size. But what if we’re wrong? What if our genes have a powerful influence over how we put on weight, and why many struggle to lose it? Over the past two decades, this once controversial idea has gained acceptance and has inspired the work of Giles Yeo. His research on the genetics of obesity at Cambridg[...]

Cath Noakes on making buildings Covid-safe (43 days old [19/01/21])

audioProfessor Cath Noakes studies how air moves and the infection risk associated with different ventilation systems. Early in the pandemic, she was invited to join the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, SAGE and asked to study the transmission routes for Covid-19. In July, together with many other scientists, she urged governments around the world and the World Health Organisation to recognise that Covid-19 could be transmitted in tiny particles in the air, even if the risk of getting infected in this way was much smaller than the risk from larger particles that travel le[...]

Chris Jackson on sustainable geology (50 days old [12/01/21])

audioChris Jackson is the kind of scientist who just loves to get out into the landscape he loves. He’s often introduced as ‘geologist and adventurer’. For the past five years he’s been Professor of Basin Analysis in the Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering at Imperial College London and he’s now about to move back to the University of Manchester, where he studied as a student, to become Professor of Sustainable Geoscience. As a child growing up in Derby, Chris learned to love the outdoors on family trips to the Peak District. Recently, you may have seen him abseiling into a crater of an a[...]

Scientists in the Spotlight during the Pandemic (77 days old [15/12/20])

audioMore of us have been exposed to so more science than ever before during 2020. And our insatiable appetite for science shows no sign of diminishing. Back in 2019, most scientists struggled to get any media attention. Now scientists involved in fighting the pandemic are generating headlines almost daily. On top of working harder than ever to further our understanding of the virus, many have become public figures. Some have been caught in the headlights. Others have stepped into the footlights. Many have found themselves at the centre of highly politicised conversations - not something a scientif[...]

Neil Ferguson on modelling Covid-19 (162 days old [22/09/20])

audioNeil Ferguson is known to many as Professor Lockdown. The mathematical models he created to predict the spread of Covid-19 were influential but, he says, it took him quite a long time to be persuaded that full lockdown was a good idea. A physicist by training, Neil switched from studying string theory to the spread of disease and presented scientific advice to government during the BSE crisis, an outbreak of foot and mouth disease in livestock in 2001 and the swine flu pandemic of 2009. In January 2020, he issued his first report on Covid-19 estimating the extent of the outbreak in Wuhan City[...]

Sarah Gilbert on developing a vaccine for Covid-19 (169 days old [15/09/20])

audioSarah Gilbert started working on a vaccine for Covid-19 just as soon as the virus genome was sequenced. Within weeks, she had a proof of principle. By early April, her team at the Jenner Institute in Oxford had manufactured hundreds of doses ready for use in clinical trials. In phase one of these trials, completed in July, this vaccine was shown to be safe for use in a thousand healthy volunteers, aged between 18 and 55. It also provoked exactly the kind of immune response to Covid-19 that Sarah was hoping to achieve. Larger scale clinical trials are currently underway in the UK, South A[...]

(C) BBC 2021

Ipswich